Dangerous Game

Contribute to Trad Gang
Become a Trad Gang Sponsor
Abowyer, Inc.





Trad Gang.com Post New Topic  Post A Reply
MY PROFILE | directory login | register | search | FAQ | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » Dangerous Game » Suggestions for Cape buffalo Arrow? (Page 1)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   
Author Topic: Suggestions for Cape buffalo Arrow?
Steelhead
Contributor 2014
Member # 9220

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Steelhead   Email Steelhead   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Looking for some suggestions from you Big game archers

My brother is going Cape buffalo hunting.he will be shooting a 80 # Morrison Shawnee with Dakota limbs made of carbon and foam.He has a 28 inch draw and arrows will be 29 inches long.

For a broadhead I am looking at a 315 grain Ashby 2 blade head

What would be a good carbon arrow to match this head up with?I am looking at the gold Tip big game and Alaskan Safari right now.Any other suggestions on another shaft welcome.

Let me know and useful tips on setting the arrow up to get in the ballpark for spine and what total grain weight he should be looking to get on the finished arrow.

Thanks for any feedback!!!

Posts: 4896 | From: Lake Orion MI. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rick McGowan
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 407

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rick McGowan   Email Rick McGowan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Its nearly a guarantee that no single shaft with have the spine and weight he will need. I've tested both those shafts and I couldn't get them to work for buffalo arrows. I would recommend a 900 grain arrow minimum. How long before he goes? Most guys worry about the bow, which is no problem and can be taken care of with a five minute phone call, the arrows are the big problem and can take months to work up. My draw is a bit longer at 29.5", but I use 2219 aluminums with a 35-55 GT inside and 300 grains of total tip weight(190 Grizzly and 110 grain adaptor)for a total arrow weight of 970 grains at 30.5 inches and they are the best flying arrows I have ever seen. The option is available now to use a carbon inside of carbon.
Posts: 1390 | From: GEORGIA, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Steelhead
Contributor 2014
Member # 9220

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Steelhead   Email Steelhead   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the response Rick.It will be more than a year before he goes.I will consider the 2219 stuffed with a GT no doubt.sounds like the Ashby head would be a good match for that arrow at 315 grains.

What poundage is your bow Rick?

Any other suggestions welcome guys.This is a work in progress and the more information the better.After I get some ideas we will be testing them and see what works best out of his setup..

Thanks Rick

Posts: 4896 | From: Lake Orion MI. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ozy clint
CONTRIBUTOR 2018
Member # 15776

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ozy clint   Email ozy clint   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
out of curiousity rick, what poundage are you shooting with that setup? did you find that the carbon inside added to the spine of the aliminium?

i got a g/t big game 100+ to work out of a 69# recurve drawn to 28". but that was at full length and with a ridiculus amount of weight up front. total is 1010gr! with no weight tubes. i would have thought that they would work on a heavier bow.

i agree that it is difficult to come up with a 900+gr carbon arrow that will work out of a 80#+ bow.

--------------------
Thick fog slowly lifts
Jagged peaks and hairy beast
Food for soul and body.

Border black douglas recurve 70# and 58# HEX6 BB2 limbs

Posts: 2364 | From: in the hills south of Stanthorpe, Qld, Australia | Registered: Mar 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tilzbow
Contributor 2008
Member # 5147

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tilzbow   Email Tilzbow   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Steelhead,

Take a look at the new Easton Full Metal Jacket dangerous game shaft. I'm not sure if the spine is heavy enough but at .250 deflection they're the heaviest spined arrows I know of. The shaft alone will weigh 500 grains at 29".

--------------------
One man thinks he can, the other doesn't. Both are right!

Posts: 255 | From: Reno Nevada | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Steelhead
Contributor 2014
Member # 9220

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Steelhead   Email Steelhead   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I will take a look at the Easton Full Metal Jacket Tilzbow.Thanks for adding to the pot.

Anyone else

Appreciate it!

Posts: 4896 | From: Lake Orion MI. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rick McGowan
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 407

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rick McGowan   Email Rick McGowan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I have 84# at 29" limbs for buffalo on my Black Widow, but its a few years old and not as fast as the current models. I called and talked to all the manufacturers, before I went on my first buff hunt and most just said they had nothing that would work. Gold Tip didn't have the Big Game 100's on the market yet, but sent me four to test, I still us them with my 80# limbs for other animals, but I can't get the weight above 700 grains even in the 80# bow. I have killed lots of stuff with them, anything smaller and not as tough as a buffalo!
The carbon inside adds LOTS to the spine, normally I shoot the 2219's out of a 63# bow. I do wrap a spiral of cotton blend sewing thread around the GT, before I push it in, that makes it a snug fit and it dosn't "buzz" in flight, it also raises the spine a bit more, I'd guess about 5#.
To give you and idea of what is involved, I probably have $350 worth of failed buffalo arrow experiments sitting over in the corner of my office. Some of them in fact work great, but you just can't get them on a reliable basis and some of them are probably collectors items!
Cory Mattson, whos photo is at the top of this page, just copied my arrows exactly, he was using an 85# Brackenbury.
The problem with the majority of the big/dangerous game arrows is that they are designed for heavy weight compound bows, not trad bows, hence the reason the GT's "100+", supposedly they are for bows over a 100#'s.

Posts: 1390 | From: GEORGIA, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Al Kidner
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 3399

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Al Kidner   Email Al Kidner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Rick, I once read an article in TBM a ways back about a hunt you did in Africa on Buff but it was called off due to some reason and instead you went and hunted a small type of deer in the jungles.

It was a top read but I think buff arrows and bow may have been some overkill!


I'll have to look it up when I'm home next and re-read it.


ak.

--------------------
"No citizen has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever Seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable." Socrates.

Posts: 2250 | From: Mackay,QLD, Australia. | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rick McGowan
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 407

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rick McGowan   Email Rick McGowan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Al, I have been in TBM a few times, but that one wasn't me. I have been accused of "overkill" more than a few times. Like when I "educated" some of the nuciance crows around camp with my open sighted .375 H&H! At least none of the hunters questioned my ability to hit a buffalo at close range after I took out five crows with six shots! Also probably the 80# bow was more than I needed for muskox, impala, caribou and it was definately more than I needed for a 30# jackel! In retrospect though, "overkill" is always better than underkill!
Posts: 1390 | From: GEORGIA, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Al Kidner
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 3399

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Al Kidner   Email Al Kidner   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Sorry Rick... thought it was you, like I said it was a ways back and I do have the memory of a goldfish at times.

I know how you feel about the crows too.


ak.

--------------------
"No citizen has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever Seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable." Socrates.

Posts: 2250 | From: Mackay,QLD, Australia. | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Steelhead
Contributor 2014
Member # 9220

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Steelhead   Email Steelhead   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks Rick

Sounds like the 2219 stuffed with a GT is a pretty easy arrow to set up and duplicate.I will be looking into that combination.What is your fletching setup on that arrow.Regualar or high back, lenght and style of fletching and 3 or 4 fletch etc.

Posts: 4896 | From: Lake Orion MI. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rick McGowan
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 407

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rick McGowan   Email Rick McGowan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Steelhead, when I first came up with those arrows, I shot them at 35 yards with NO fletching and they flew PERFECTLY! However I do put feathers on them. Four 5" BLUE parabolic helical feathers at 75-105 degrees. I like the four fletch, because I know that if can go wrong it WILL go wrong on a buffalo hunt and I don't have to take my eyes off the buffalo to make sure the arrow goes on the string the right way, also it does give the arrow a bit more stabilization in case I get excited and make a sloppy release and I can put five of them in my bow quiver and arrange them so that the feathers don't rub each other and make noise. I use blue because it shows up really well even in low light, but dosn't spook most animals, because they can't see colors. We had one bowhunter with a hip quiver and a white cock feather on each arrow, spook every buffalo he tried to crawl up on, just because of those couple little feathers waving around. To be fair I do have lots of other formulas for buffalo arrows, BUT these will shoot all the way through the biggest buff with that bow and they are not real difficult to make and you can take them back apart and make changes if necessary and even at using two shafts for each arrow they are still cheaper than some of the alternatives.
Posts: 1390 | From: GEORGIA, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rik
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 1872

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rik   Email Rik   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
It's probably a little easier to get high quality Ipe shafts in the proper spine and weight than it is to try to modify carbons.

I used Ipe on two buffalo in Australia with great penetration. Plus, like Dr. Ashby's report says, heavy wood shafts have less breakage on impact with heavy ribs than either carbon or aluminum shafts.

Mine were ultra-straight, spined at 75 pounds, and weighed 860 grains with a 160-grain Grizzly. You can easily order higher spined and heavier ones.

If you want them with more weight forward, I saw some glue-on weight-forward adapters at 3-Rivers that would be just the ticket.

Posts: 607 | From: Horseshoe Bend, Idaho | Registered: Nov 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Steelhead
Contributor 2014
Member # 9220

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Steelhead   Email Steelhead   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks for the tips Rick on the fletching.Sounds very practical.

Where can you get heavyspined heavy wieght Ipe arrows Rik.investing in a dozen shafts sounds like it would be realatively low cost and worth a test drive.Are they 11/32 or 23/64 or fatter?

Thanks fellows

Posts: 4896 | From: Lake Orion MI. | Registered: May 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Rick McGowan
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 407

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Rick McGowan   Email Rick McGowan   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I actually tried ipe, hickory and the compressed hemlock "Battleshafts", however to work, I needed spines around 100#'s and getting those in any reliable quantity wasn't possible, so I gave up on the hardwoods. The Battleshafts were awesome, 5/16 diameter, smooth, round, heavy and had a tapering density, so they were heavier at the front, but like the other woods, I couldn't rely on getting them and now they aren't even made.
Posts: 1390 | From: GEORGIA, USA | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   

Quick Reply ~ PLEASE THINK BEFORE YOU POST! - Is your post trad bowhunting related? Check the FAQ or EMAIL if you're unsure!
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Shoot On Over To:


Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | Privacy Statement

Copyright 2003 thru 2017 ~ Trad Gang.com ©

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1