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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » Trad History/Collecting » What can you tell me about the Conolon Missilite bows?

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Author Topic: What can you tell me about the Conolon Missilite bows?
jwingman
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Hi,

Does anyone have any information on Conolon Missilite bows? Where, when were they made? Any info about them would be appreciated. I have one coming that looks awful nice. I have always admired their lines.
Thanks
Jwingman

Posts: 654 | From: Rochester, New York | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jwingman
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No one has any info on these bows?
Thanks
Jwingman

Posts: 654 | From: Rochester, New York | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TommyBoy
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Never heard of them before in my life - ya got a pic?

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TommyBoy

Posts: 329 | From: Greenwood, Missouri | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bill Carlsen
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I think they are from the 50's or early 60's. Sorry, don't remember much about them but the name. I think, but don't remember for sure, that they were experimental in that they were using "new" space age materials of the time in a effort to apply them to bows. They were not on the market very long. I bet George Stout would have something on them.

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Posts: 4950 | From: New Hampshire | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jwingman
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Here are some pictures. I have seen both longbows and recurves. They called this a recurve but it is more like a very reflex deflex longbow. It is 64 inches and 47#@28 inches. the handles that I have seen are all about the same as this. A slight reverse handle. The bow looks like an early 21st century style bow almost. I do not know when it was made. There is no date on the bow. The glass is a woven product that looks like the glass on the Herters bows only green instead. No checking or any of those problems on this glass. The bow is dead quiet even without any silencers. I don't know if anyone else has any of these. I would see them on the big auction sight once in a while but always seemed to lose out. This one I was able to finalize.
Thanks
jwingman
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Posts: 654 | From: Rochester, New York | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
twigflicker
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I had a friend give me one that his parents had given him as a youngster in the 50's.... Looks just like James' but mine is only 40#'s... I use it a lot when working on form issues...

Jonathan

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Posts: 827 | From: Jeffersonville, IN | Registered: May 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kevin L.
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I like the look of that. I'll have to keep an eye out and see if I can find one up here. I used to have a Miami Valley recurve that was very similar, with just a touch more curvature at the tips.

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Posts: 1811 | From: Waynesboro, VA | Registered: Sep 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
AALLFAB
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I think they are also related to the Garcia and the Whites archery bow companies in some way. Jim
Posts: 365 | From: Colorado | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tread104
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Conolon developed an early type of fiberglass that was used in these bows and were better known for their fishing rods. It is a cross grain pattern that will begin to fray on the edges of the limbs. This has been my experience. I own about eight of them and have done a lot of searching but with little luck. Other brands with nearly identical features include Galco and White. The tips on the Galco models are less pronounced and the composite making up the handles is almost translucent. I have not found any info on where they were produced. If you ever find out let me know.

I got my first one about two years ago and prefer it to a number of my custom bows. The lower poundage models like #146 do not have a shelf but are still unique, very wide limbs with almost no riser material.

I have bid some of them up fairly high, however, I have now idea what they are really worth. If memory serves me correct I lost out on your bow over a year ago. It was the last one of the last ones I have seen. From attending a number of shoots the old timers tell me that they come from the 50's and were available in chain sporting goods stores. The bow in the picture looks like a model number #350. Let me know if you ever get tired of that old bow as I would love to add another one to the bow rack.

Good Luck

Posts: 4 | From: Mars, PA | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tread104
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An American company named NARMCO invented the first hollow fiberglass fishing rod blanks in 1946. Dr. Glenn Havens, head of research for NARMCO, is credited for the invention. Though fibers made of glass can be traced back to the 1890s, Owens-Corning is credited for the invention of fiberglass in 1938.

NARMCO was a WW 2 weapons manufacturing plant that used fiberglass in some of their parts. Their name was an acronym for the National Armament Company.

NARMCO became the Narmco Conolon Company at their factory in Santa Ana, California and fishing rod production began in 1947. Armed and ready (pun intended) they quickly became the world’s largest producer of fiberglass rods. Prior to this invention; all fishing rods were made of split bamboo, wood or steel.

Narmco Conolon maintained the lead by covering the full spectrum from ultra-light spinning, bait casting and fly rods to powerful heavy-duty sea rods.

In the early sixties; The Garcia Corporation became the new owner and changed the name to The Conolon Corporation with Howard Ashby as President. Mr. Ashby was also a Garcia Vice President.

Notes:
Early rod materials were just called “fiberglass”, then “Missilite” (a chemical bonding finish they had used instead of rivets on their old products such as bombs and guess what, missiles!) to seal the fiberglass rods, then quickly changed due to the negative implications to “Conolock” then to “Live Fiber” in the fifties.

All of these “surnames” were no longer used when bought by Garcia.

The Conolon Corporation closed in 1982

SEE:http://en.allexperts.com/q/Fishing-1634/2008/4/f/Garcia-Conolon.htm

Posts: 4 | From: Mars, PA | Registered: Jul 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
jwingman
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Tread104,

That is some neat information. I appreciate the time you took to put that together. jwingman

Posts: 654 | From: Rochester, New York | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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