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Author Topic: coyotes
ammoeater
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I received these in an email yesterday. Supposedly taken on the #4 hole of the Fargo Country Club...

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Posts: 78 | From: New Jersey | Registered: Oct 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
redpepper49
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the first coyote I saw was 1968 in Hardeman county west tennessee. Shot him with a browning nomad . We were excited there was a new animal to see . People still talk about it when they see a coyote they are a little fasinating . I may not like them but their songs sure adds something to a quite dark night .
Posts: 87 | From: tennessee | Registered: Dec 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LimBender
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From what I've heard, really hard to permanently dent without extensive trapping (and even that can be undone fairly quickly). Apparently yotes are very self-regulating on reproduction, meaning if they get knocked back they will up the litter size. Doesn't mean I wouldn't shoot one on sight though. [Razz]

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>>>---TGMM Family of the Bow--->

Shoot some Zippers and a Bear.

Posts: 1241 | From: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LimBender
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Amazing pics Ammoeater!

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>>>---TGMM Family of the Bow--->

Shoot some Zippers and a Bear.

Posts: 1241 | From: Louisiana | Registered: Jan 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bill Tell
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So how do we hunt them with a recurve?

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"I'm going to find my direction magnetically. " Eddie Vedder

Posts: 410 | From: Geneva, IL | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Hoyt
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Interesting facts about a coyote study done by Dr. Kilgo in the Savannah River Plant.


Sunday, June 24, 2007COMMENTPRINTEMAIL It's difficult to peek inside the secret world of a predator and its prey, but John Kilgo has the patience to make it happen.


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Special
This nocturnal coyote was photographed with a remote control camera at Savannah River Site. Coyotes in Georgia and South Carolina weigh an average of 28 pounds.
Click photo for optionsFor the second spring in a row, the U.S. Forest Service research biologist is using radio telemetry to determine how frequently whitetail fawns are killed and eaten by coyotes. The results, although preliminary, are disturbing.

"This year we caught and followed 22 fawns," he said. "Of those, eight were killed by coyotes, three by bobcats and one we haven't figured out yet."

The studies, conducted at Savannah River Site, are in their second year.

In 2006, Kilgo and his colleagues captured and observed just five fawns. Coyotes ate four of them.

Kilgo, who plans to continue his research at least two more years, cautions that his findings are preliminary. But he acknowledges there is mounting evidence that coyotes may affect deer populations.

In conjunction with the radio tracking studies of fawns, graduate student Josh Schrecengost has been collecting and analyzing coyote droppings at SRS for two years.

"He collected scats during two fawning seasons, with May being the biggest month, and into the first part of June," Kilgo said. "He collected scats all over the site, 30 to 40 samples each month."

The findings show coyotes eat plenty of fawns.

"From the two Mays he surveyed, 31 and 38 percent of the scats contained fawn remains, meaning roughly a third of the coyote meals are fawns," Kilgo said. "That's starting to look kind of compelling."

Although coyotes prefer fawns during fawning season, the bulk of their complex diet is fruit.

"Even during fawning season, fawns are not the No. 1 food item," he said. "It's wild plums in May, blackberries in June and black cherries in July. In August they eat pokeweed, and in September, they're after persimmons."

The evidence that expanding coyote populations account for expanding deer mortality could become a cause of concern for wildlife managers.

"In the Southeast, since coyotes have been here, the general consensus from the deer biology community has been that they're not a problem," Kilgo said. "For a long time the region has had more deer than it needs, so it's been viewed as coyotes helping control the population."

Today, however, the coyote's growing numbers could be linked to reductions in deer density, but more research is needed.

"In some areas there are still too many deer, but in other areas we're seeing fewer and fewer deer," said Kilgo, adding that South Carolina and SRS are down significantly.

Future studies could help unravel the extent to which coyotes affect deer herds, Kilgo said. Coyotes first appeared in the SRS area in the 1980s and became widespread and common by the mid-'90s.

"After that they really took off, and whether they've leveled off in the last few years or are still increasing, we don't know yet," he said. "The bottom line is, we have a lot of coyotes now that we didn't have 15 years ago, and that increase in coyotes - concurrent with the decrease in deer - is what motivated the study."

Reach Rob Pavey at (706) 868-1222, ext. 119, or rob.pavey@augustachronicle.com.

PRELIMINARY FINDINGS

- This spring, scientists studied 22 newborn fawns; eight were eaten by coyotes, three by bobcats and one died of unknown causes.

- Last summer, four of five fawns studied were killed by coyotes, but the sample was deemed too small to be conclusive.

- About one-third of coyote droppings collected at SRS in May 2006 and May 2007 contained fawn remains.

Posts: 1294 | From: illinois | Registered: Oct 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
SveinD
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Well when you think about it the deer ain't all ours.. Coyotes gotta eat to, and wolves and bears and cougars and wolverines etc [Smile]

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Centaur 58" Glass XTL 40@28

~Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand~ Kurt Vonnegut

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LongStick64
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Thats Life,,,,,who are we to command all, we are just part of the puzzle not the entire puzzle. Soon as we accept how we fit in and how we can be a part of nature, the better. Good for the Coyote, I bet he was hungry.

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."There is no excellence in archery without great labour."

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Bonebuster
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When I first started hunting in Michigan,(1978) coyotes were an animal of the desert southwest.
Skinny and frail. They ate mostly mice. We never spoke of coyotes here in Michigan, because there was no need.

I shot THREE, yesterday evening from my back porch. A female, and two males...the female was in heat. The female was 38 lbs and the two males were a tad larger. My wife just happened to catch them out the window, and they were paying more attention to each other than me. [Big Grin]

They are an invasive species in many areas that they now thrive. Chances are, the coyote will change your hunting in the near future.

I hope my last statement turns out to be completely wrong.

Posts: 3434 | From: Michigan | Registered: Feb 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
rdoggsilva
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Out west here we have been hunting and trapping them, for over a hundred years. Guess what they are still here. They can survive just about any where.
Posts: 480 | From: Salt Lake City,Ut. | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
wildgame
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by SveinD:
Well when you think about it the deer ain't all ours.. Coyotes gotta eat to, and wolves and bears and cougars and wolverines etc [Smile] [/QUOTE

I agree 100% but there numbers need to be regulated. The population of coyotes here are way up and bout three of us has around 10000 acres to manage and its tuff to keep the numbers where there not so much a problem . We've killed around 40 the past 8-10 months and still see them a little more often than I like. I'm finally seeing rabbits again so I guess were helping the matter thou!

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"go afield with good attitude,and with respect for the wildlife you hunt, and the forest and fields in which you walk" -Fred Bear

Posts: 1036 | From: kentucky | Registered: Dec 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LongStick64
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You want to control Coyote's......get Wolves, the proven Coyote killer. I agree that for the most part to expect hunters to manage the numbers of coyotes is sort of like expecting hunters to manage the hog population. It comes down to a numbers game and an animals will to survive on a daily basis. Most of do not get the chance to hunt 365 days a year, they do.
Downstate here in NY we have plenty of Coyotes and a ample of opportunity to hunt them, no bag limits and a long season, Oct 1 - March 27. But we still have a large population of them and they have adapted to living close to dense population very well, better than chipmunks.

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."There is no excellence in archery without great labour."

Posts: 2144 | From: New York - LI | Registered: Nov 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jack Whitmire Jr
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When the end comes 2 things will survive cockroaches and Coyotes .

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Tolerance is a virtue of a man without any Morals- unknown author

Posts: 1069 | From: Scott Depot, WV | Registered: Sep 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
NYArrow
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There seems to be a huge amount of study/information on coyotes and their negative impact on some of our favorite game animals. I truly believe this is largely true. There is an underlying thought in the back of my mind that makes me second guess it just a bit (in my area that is). On any given day with fresh snow, old snow or no snow I could search long and hard and not likely find a kill site. I'm not sure about you guys, obviously out west they are really doing a bit of damage; however where I am I have yet to personally see deer and coyote tracks cross. Any thoughts on that?

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Choose this day whom you will serve...as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.
Joshua 24:15

Posts: 365 | From: NY | Registered: Dec 2010  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
hydrasport205
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I think Bonebuster said it well. coyotes will change our hunting!
Posts: 306 | From: kentucky | Registered: Mar 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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