Contribute to Trad Gang
Become a Trad Gang Sponsor
Visit the Sponsor Classifieds
Kustom King Traditional Archery










Click for the CLASSIFIEDS RULES



Trad Gang.com   
MY PROFILE | directory login | register | search | FAQ | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Trad Gang.com » Topic Archives » Shooting » How do you quiet yourself? (Page 2)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4   
Author Topic: How do you quiet yourself?
b.glass
Contributor 2013
Member # 2507

Icon 1 posted      Profile for b.glass   Email b.glass   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I'm not sure of the answer to that question. But I distinctly remember one day when I was "there". My husband was watching my nephew and myself shooting. I was hitting the mark pretty consistantly. My nephew would shoot then I would shoot. After one of my shots my husband made the comment "It didn't work did it?" My nephew had this disgusted look on his face and then I recalled that he had been saying something as I was shooting. That's when I realized he had been trying to distract me. I was "there". I'm with Shaun, It's when I don't feel like I have to "do" anything that I shoot the best. How do you get "there"...? I'll have to think about that!

--------------------
B.Glass, aka Mom, aka Longbowwoman
Gregory R. Glass Feb. 14th, 1989-April 1st, 2007; Forever 18.
TGMM Family of The Bow
Mark 5:36 "Don't be afraid, just believe".

Posts: 3373 | From: Indiana | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
splat38
Member
Member # 5358

Icon 1 posted      Profile for splat38   Author's Homepage   Email splat38   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
M
Posts: 6 | From: Weymouth UK | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
splat38
Member
Member # 5358

Icon 1 posted      Profile for splat38   Author's Homepage   Email splat38   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
New UK member .Hi you lucky people.Wish i lived in a country where bow hunting was leagle.
For me when i make the perfect shot i know as soon as the string slides off my tab that it's a hit.
This is the magic that keeps me shooting,plus the fact that stuff occasionaly gets in the way of my already released arrows.Remember the good shots,forget the bad ones.
Like training a dog:keep it positive

Posts: 6 | From: Weymouth UK | Registered: Jan 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
paradocs
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 42

Icon 1 posted      Profile for paradocs   Email paradocs   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I knew that was comin'
Posts: 818 | From: Virginia | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
B.O.D.
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 4932

Icon 1 posted      Profile for B.O.D.   Author's Homepage   Email B.O.D.       Edit/Delete Post 
Noelle, I think mmmmm, this is going to be tasty in my cast iron skillet w/ mushrooms, biscuits and gravy....... I'm a father of 6, gotta think meat lady. lol! ASHSTYK
Posts: 3391 | From: the 1000 Islands region of Ontario. | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
twobows
Contributor 2017
Member # 106

Icon 1 posted      Profile for twobows   Email twobows   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Noelle,
I have never been calm when a deer comes with in range, I make the call yes or no if I decide yes I go blank and look through the deer and it happens. A short blood trail and give thanks to the MAN

Posts: 31 | From: southern indiana | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
mikeschwister
Member
Member # 5096

Icon 1 posted      Profile for mikeschwister   Author's Homepage   Email mikeschwister   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I do best when I just shoot, focus on the spot and let it happen. Then I enjoy the uncontrollable shakes and pounding chest. If I ever get over that part I will probable quit.

Mike

Posts: 63 | From: Northen Virginia | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
gregg dudley
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 3093

Icon 1 posted      Profile for gregg dudley   Author's Homepage   Email gregg dudley   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I always visualize 3d targets as game animals and I build a running commentary in my head. "He's coming in, he dropped his head, pick a spot..." I never have a sense of urgency when I am target shooting unless the season is approaching and I am shooting poorly. I can get disgusted if I start making a series of errant shots, but it is still fun.

When I hit a hunting scenario, I do the same thing. A little auto pilot voice runs through the narration until the opportunity presents itself and then I blank out conscious thought except for "pick a spot," and make the shot. My theory is that by visualizing hunting scenarios during practice, I am making the actual hunt a more familiar experience.

I always remember the sight picture, but I very rarely remember making a conscious decision to shoot. What Jeff said before has a lot of merit.

Now, after the shot? That's another story. I come unglued after the shot!

--------------------
MOLON LABE

Traditional Bowhunters Of Florida
Come shoot with us!

Posts: 5834 | From: weirsdale, fl | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tom Leemans
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 79

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tom Leemans   Email Tom Leemans   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
I've found that if I breathe calmly, the adrenaline shakes go away after about 30 seconds. It seems much longer than that but I've timed it.

--------------------
Got wood? - Tom

Posts: 4847 | From: Illinois | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
N. Naiden
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 426

Icon 1 posted      Profile for N. Naiden   Email N. Naiden   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"then I go blank" - that is exactly what I think many people do - they are doing something to center themselves and focus but may not know what they are doing?

I loved Shawn's reply, "I do nothing" - talk about Zen, that's perfect.

I have used a visualization sequence called 'grounding' and it works with breath and breathing, but I often wonder if there are better methods to doing it.

I have read Zen and the Art of Archery over and over, and confess my western mind sometimes gets in my way.

It is a combinations of opposites though, the comment of "tension and relaxation" rings true.

And it makes sense that military style trainging would help greatly - can anyone tell a totally uninitiated person exactly what is Marie style, or military style, training in shooting? Other that accuracy skills, do military agencies teach about staying centered and still in the midst of chaos? How do they do it?

One friend who was a Green Beret in Vietnam told me his preparation was far superior to those who were drafted - he listed the things he had been trained in, but never mentioned stillness, or centering. There are lots of names that would apply.

Thank you for the responses! For me this is the trick to being consistent - my form is fairly consistent, my quieted mind is another story....

Posts: 324 | From: Montana | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Weasel
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 843

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Weasel   Author's Homepage   Email Weasel   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
"How do you quiet yourself?"

One word; Xanax [laffsmyl]

I TRY to remember to exhale slowly and focus on "the spot". I remember the last buck I killed. I caught myself looking at the whole lung area, then narrowed my focus on a small spot at the tip of the elbow. It was really weird when I did that. My concentration went into a "tunnel vision" mode, just sorta zoomed in from the whole side to the small spot as if it were really in a tunnel. Funny what our minds do in those adrenaline filled situations.

Did I mention Xanax?

--------------------
I have a free roaming, ranging mind -- sometimes it reports back to me...
---------------------------

Posts: 1208 | From: Eugene, OR | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
insttech1
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 966

Icon 1 posted      Profile for insttech1   Email insttech1   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Noelle...
Military-level marksmanship training is hard to explain...

I will give you an analogy that applies more toward rifle shooting, but applies to all disciplines...

bear in mind--this does not relate to "combat" conditions--this is about long-range precision and focus for marksmanship, specifically 500-meter open sights against torso silhouettes...

Form is first, as in anything requiring precision...and in archery, everyone has minor variations, so I can't tell you much except you must concentrate on consistency above all else...

You must be able to focus on your target, but not to the exclusion of all else...you have to keep some tiny portion of your mind "open" to external influence, like someone shouting cease fire, or determining that there are more deer behind the one you just drew on, etc...

I hear some people can not keep from shooting once they're drawn, and that just doesn't cut it for me...so therefore some little portion of that calculator still has to be free to work...

In true precision work, after your form and environmental variables, the next two detractors are breathing and heart rate...believe it or not, the ebb and flow of your blood thru your body changes the position of whatever you're holding, in tiny increments...just try and focus a rifle on a pop bottle at 500 yards....you'll see what I mean...

But the heart's rate and breathing can be controlled, to an extent...

It is natural to become excited on a game animal...but once you commit to the shot, that's when the body goes into autonomous function, IF YOU HAVE PRACTICED ENOUGH!!

You are striving for unconscious concentration, with conscious movement, as you know that too much movement will attract attention...

But once you get in a position to draw, and subsequently shoot, your body should remember, thru repetition, the steps required execute a good shot...

The steps are basically: form, breathing, and heart rate, release control, and follow-thru...

Form should come OK, thru practice...
Breathing takes more time...because of the added excitement of live game...same goes for heartrate..

Release control is just that--even though some say you shouldn't know when it happens...well, you should! That's is what controls where we hit...by knowing when to execute the shot after we pick an impact point to hit...it's just the last few milliseconds that the breath is held, and the heart has slowed to where the body knows you are steady enough to shoot--even if you don't!

Granted, you DO NOT KNOW THIS as it is happening, it just comes together...

The way to make it come together, though, is through enough practice of controlling your form on targets, that the body automatically reverts to that form when you draw on critters--including sub-conscious control of breathing, heart rate, release, and follow-thru...

I know some of this is jumbled, and maybe out of order, but in essence, once you have all of the aspects of your form down, there are three portions of your mind that we be "working"...

One is excited as all hell...
It's subconscious brother is stopping adrenaline production for 2 seconds as you shoot...
And the safety nazi in the back of your head is watching to make sure everything else is a "go"...

Hope this helps some...will check back later...
Marc

--------------------
"When you catch Hell--DROP IT!! When you're going thru Hell--DON'T STOP!!"

Posts: 2606 | From: fenton michigan | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
insttech1
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 966

Icon 1 posted      Profile for insttech1   Email insttech1   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
ttt for noelle...

--------------------
"When you catch Hell--DROP IT!! When you're going thru Hell--DON'T STOP!!"

Posts: 2606 | From: fenton michigan | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Jeff Strubberg
Contributor 2010
Member # 4552

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Jeff Strubberg   Email Jeff Strubberg   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
Noelle,


One thing that really helps is to visualize a perfect arrow as you begin your draw. Practice it in front of a blank target. Shoot calmy, in control until you execute one that is just right. Then, the next few shots your goal is to see that perfecct arrow and let your mind "make it so".

After a while you will see your target approach the spot, being your draw and already be thinking "Yeah, like that." the arrow is gone before you have time for more than that.


You know what? This is one heck of a lot harder to write about than to do. We adults complicate the heck outta the simplest things.

--------------------
"Teach him horsemanship and archery, and teach him to despise all lies" -Herodotus

Posts: 3508 | From: Linn, MO | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Mike Brown
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 324

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Mike Brown   Email Mike Brown   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post 
If I shot in a traditional dress after work I would keep quiet about it too... [Smile]
Posts: 373 | From: Deer Park Tx | Registered: Mar 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 4 pages: 1  2  3  4   

   Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Shoot On Over To:


Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | Privacy Statement

Copyright 2003 thru 2017 ~ Trad Gang.com ©

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1