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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » The Shooters FORM Forum » Yet another grip question. (Page 1)

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Author Topic: Yet another grip question.
jonsimoneau
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This is more of a recurve thing. But I've seen guys who only grip the bow using their pointer finger and their thumb. Just 2 fingers actually touching the bow. I've also seen guys who grip it with their thumb and then their first 2 fingers touching the face of the bow at a 45 degree angle. All things being equal which one is more accurate? Seems to me the less contact with the bow the better. So if a guy can figure out how to do it by only using 2 fingers touching the bow as opposed to three he should be better off? Any thoughts?
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Tradcat
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I have the same question! I'll be curious at the thoughts of those who chime in
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reddogge
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It's a personal choice but grip style influences how you grip it. It would be hard to use two fingers on a low grip but easy on a high grip.

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PBS Reg member 1973
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McDave
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I use the thumb and forefinger method, since I have a tendency to torque the bow otherwise. The other fingers touch the bow handle, but they're just along for the ride.

To make this work, I find a place where I can pull the weight of the bow back against the web between my thumb and forefinger, so that the bow doesn't need any other support to be held at full draw. In other words, I can open my hand at full draw and the bow won't go anywhere. The only purpose of the thumb and forefinger hold is to keep the bow from flying out of my hand when I shoot it.

I never ask for a high grip; I don't think I've ever shot a bow that has one. I just ask for whatever the normal grip is that the bowyer makes. I don't shoot with a high grip like Fred Asbell does. Some of the weight of the bow rests on the meaty part of my hand between my thumb and lifeline, but I make sure the force vector of the bow is centered at the bottom of the V between my thumb and forefinger.

Rod Jenkins taught me that. He shoots where it is hot and muggy, and doesn't use anything to improve his grip on the bow when his hand gets slick with sweat.

Not all bows are amenable to being gripped like that. If I get one that's not, it doesn't stay on my rack very long.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

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nhbuck1
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Now can you use the thumb and forefinger method on a longbow? I'm confused on how many fingers should be on the riser while gripping, I know the compound says 2 with rest tucked wouldn't this be the same?

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aim small miss small

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McDave
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I think it depends on the longbow. Longbows with shaped grips seem to be amenable to the thumb and forefinger method. I have a Schaffer longbow and a Toelke longbow that I grip that way. I don't know about straight handled Hill style longbows; maybe somebody else will answer that.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

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nhbuck1
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what about recurves? i notice people grip with the whole hand is theis wrong i dont get it?

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aim small miss small

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McDave
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Grip is a very personal thing. Some grips work for some people and not for others. A full handed grip would be fine as long as you don't torque the bow.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

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slowbowjoe
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My (limited) experience says the bow will tell you what grip it likes.
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nhbuck1
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how will it tell you joe? can you please explain

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aim small miss small

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katman
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First thing I do with a new bow with a different grip is close bale shooting finding where to put the pressure point to make the bow not twist with an open hand at full draw, as McDave said, and jump straight to target on release. Then start bow and arrow tuning.

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shoot straight shoot often

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Firstlight
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I think McDave summed it up pretty well.

On my LB I have thumb + index and middle finger lightly touching the bow, so it won't fly out upon release. Hand at 45 degrees. Which is what I do for the recurve. The fingers are doing nothing else, just relaxed with no tension.

As McDave stated (this to applies to me): "To make this work, I find a place where I can pull the weight of the bow back against the web between my thumb and forefinger, so that the bow doesn't need any other support to be held at full draw. In other words,** I can open my hand at full draw and the bow won't go anywhere. The only purpose of the thumb and forefinger hold is to keep the bow from flying out of my hand when I shoot it."

Search out Moebow's youtube videos on the subject, he has some good ones on grip.

...gripping this way should eliminate any torque.

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nhbuck1
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so just draw the bow with an open hand then lightly rest fingers

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aim small miss small

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McDave
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Once you find the right place to grip the bow, you probably don't want to actually draw the bow with an open hand, but your grip should be secure enough that you could open your hand at full draw if you want to without the bow going anywhere. You find the "right place" by experimenting at a close range in front of a blank bale, and changing your grip very slightly every few shots until your own body tells you that you've found it.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

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olddogrib
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I think it would shock most people to discover what differences relatively tiny changes in grip will produce. IMHO the question is not so much how many fingers but whether those fingers are imparting any influence to the riser at release, i.e. imperceptibly rocking it forward or backward against the pressure point of the bow hand enough to cause shot to shot inconsistency. I have a Jager Best 2.0 medium wrist that I consider to be a great grip and focuses the pressure where it needs to be. Nonetheless, I would still occasionally get a slight nock low bobble on release. I'd chased this unsuccessfully with nock height, but I found out by accident that when I lifted the meaty base of the thumb slightly and focused the pressure of the bow hand entirely at the base of the thumb/index finger the bobble went away and bare shafts flew like darts. I've got a high wrist coming to prove my theory. I think this is unique for every bow..I've also seen some you could go from open handed to a full "death grip" choke with little noticeable impact.

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"Wakan Tanka
Wakan Tanka
Pilamaya
Wichoni heh"

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