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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » The Shooters FORM Forum » Help with choosing arrow spine (Page 2)

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Author Topic: Help with choosing arrow spine
longbow fanatic 1
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Yes, it's likely that the arrow spine was the culprit for the arrow striking your hand. When that has happened to me, it was because the arrow was too stiff. Remember that raising your nock height, or lowering it for that matter, will not change left/right impacts (stiffness/weakness). The suggestion I could offer would be to do one or more of the following: 1.Increasing brace height will weaken the shaft stiffness. This is counter intuitive. Raising the brace height adds draw weight to the limbs, adding initial inertia and weakening the shaft. It also shortens the power stroke (this is the counter intuitive part) reducing the time the arrow remains on the string. It seems logical to think that reducing the brace height, and thereby the power stroke, would weaken the arrow. I thought that as the case anyway before I read Anthony Camera's book. 2. Add arrow point tip weight. 3. Move the arrow closer to the riser by reducing thickness of strike plate material. Hope this helps.
Posts: 2608 | From: Illinois | Registered: Dec 2008  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Joshua Sexton
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Well, I finally got a couple GT XT 500'S. Loaded them up with 175 grain tips and I'm still cutting my knuckle wide open. There is some outside shelf wear as well. And since I'm bleeding so much I was able to see where my arrows are contacting my hand. It's about 8" down the shaft from the back all the way to the back of the shaft and between the cock feather out and the feather pointing down, about 7 o'clock if looking down the shaft from the back.

I'm at a complete loss. I've never had this much trouble with a bow. My Bob Lee didn't do this, nor my dad's Assenheimer.

I've tried different grips, release styles, split finger, 3 under. High nock, low nock. I'm lost

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McDave
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I'm somewhat familiar with the Hoyt Buffalo, as I have a friend who has one and have shot his bow. It seems to have a reasonably sized shelf and adequate separation between the grip and the arrow. I have Bob Lee recurves myself, which I consider to have the best standard grips there are. While the Bob Lee's and the Buffalo are different, the basic geometry of the grips and shelf seems similar. I don't know why you would cut yourself on one and not the other.

If I cut my finger like you describe, it has been because I am shooting a longbow with a very narrow shelf and a grip designed so my hand is very close to the arrow. Then my forefinger will slip up sometimes and be cut by a quill. I don't think I've ever been cut by the arrow shaft itself. I solve this problem by making sure that the leading edges of the quills are well glued down, and if they are not well tapered, I give them a little additional tapering with a sharp knife after they are glued down, and then put an extra dab of glue on the end of the quill.

I don't mind being reminded sometimes if my forefinger is contacting the arrow, because if my forefinger lifts up the arrow, it will cause me to miss high.

Your case seems different though. I can't imagine ever hitting my forefinger with my Bob Lee recurve or a Buffalo, because the way the grips are designed, my hand just isn't that close to the arrow. Do you think the arrow is falling off the rest? What kind of rest material are you using? I think the best kind of rest material to use with a Buffalo would be something that would allow some kind of gap between the shelf and the strike plate, forming a slight groove to hold the arrow and keep it from falling out.

In any event, whenever you injure yourself, whether you are hitting your face with the string or your forefinger with an arrow, it becomes super sensitive until it heals, which makes it difficult to concentrate on your shot. So you should probably wear some kind of light glove, like a golf glove or something, on your shooting hand until you figure out what's going on.

--------------------
TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

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Joshua Sexton
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I'm actually hitting the knuckle and not my finger. I have a picture of me holding the grip where you can see the wear and cuts on my shelf and hand. Not sure how to post it though.

Using some bear hair rest material as well. I might replace it with mole skin and build it up as you described with a groove to contain the arrow a bit. Unless I'm plucking the string that bad that the arrow is coming off the shelf I can't imagine what else to do.

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Joshua Sexton
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Update. I built the shelf up a few mm with moleskin and a toothpick as a very slight retainer on the outer edge of the shelf. That took care of the knuckle cutting issue. Not sure if it is due to the height of the shelf, which isn't a whole lot, or the retainer, but I didn't hit my knuckle. Let's call that progress.

Now, bareshaft testing GT 500's full length and Easton 2018's at 30.25". They are shooting well right, which is a weak arrow. So, I looked at GT spine chart and it says I should be shooting .400 deflection. So, perhaps I was getting a super weak arrow flexing and hitting my hand. Likely compounded with a nock point too high or low. To confirm this I short drawed the bow and zip, right down the pike, the bare shafts flew perfectly straight.

So, I'm going to a friend's tonight to trim some of the weak arrows and try to get them stiff enough. Here's to hoping it works!!!

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Joshua Sexton
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Update. I built the shelf up a few mm with moleskin and a toothpick as a very slight retainer on the outer edge of the shelf. That took care of the knuckle cutting issue. Not sure if it is due to the height of the shelf, which isn't a whole lot, or the retainer, but I didn't hit my knuckle. Let's call that progress.

Now, bareshaft testing GT 500's full length and Easton 2018's at 30.25". They are shooting well right, which is a weak arrow. So, I looked at GT spine chart and it says I should be shooting .400 deflection. So, perhaps I was getting a super weak arrow flexing and hitting my hand. Likely compounded with a nock point too high or low. To confirm this I short drawed the bow and zip, right down the pike, the bare shafts flew perfectly straight.

So, I'm going to a friend's tonight to trim some of the weak arrows and try to get them stiff enough. Here's to hoping it works!!!

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the rifleman
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Joshua, do you have any lighter field tips---125 grain--even better--85-100? You may be able to get your 500s to tune with a much lighter point weight---might not be what you want for hunting, but at least you could use your current arrows and verify tune before buying 400s. Just an idea...
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Joshua Sexton
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Thanks John. I have cut them down to 29.5" and they are flying better. I am meaning to call you and stop up to shoot with you still. I've just been preoccupied with my girlfriend's health concerns lately. As soon as I get a weekend to stop up I'll make a plan with you.

I have been shooting with 125's and that was the tip weight I was getting all my initial results with. I do not have any lighter weight points unfortunately.

Do you happen to have any 400's I might test?

Posts: 17 | From: OH | Registered: Jul 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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