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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » The Shooters FORM Forum » Learning instinctive aiming (Page 1)

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Author Topic: Learning instinctive aiming
jonwilson
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This is definitely a "newb" question. [Confused]

I've stated in previous posts, but for those that don't know, I have been shooting compounds since I was a teenager. I have been shooting my longbow for a couple of months and want to learn to shoot instinctively. I, obviously, had pins to aim with on the compound, so I had a reference point. How do I make sure my arrows (Easton Axis Traditional 500s) are tuned for my Bear Montana longbow if I am still learning proper form?

Should I be learning a different aiming method as a beginner in trad archery?

Should I even worry about my arrows at this point?

I definitely want my equipment to be tuned up so I know that if I am not grouping good, it is my fault.

Does that even make sense? [dunno]

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Posts: 138 | From: Carthage, Mississippi | Registered: Aug 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
kevsuperg
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Concentrate on form first, if your form is solid and repeatable then tuning arrows will be much easier.
Depending on the arrows length and tip weight 500s will be ok. Sure others will join in soon with their opinions.
Give us some more specifics on the bow, draw weight draw length etc and some arrows specs too.

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Pat B
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I learned from reading G. Fred Asbel's book "Instinctive Shooting". Fred gives lots of good pointers and I'd suggest his book for a beginner instinctive shooter.

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jonwilson
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The bow is a 64" Bear Montana longbow - 45# at 28". My draw length is 26.5".

The arrows are Easton Axis Traditional 500s - GPI = 8.9 and Stock Length = 31". They have not been cut.

Also, I know my head weight will play a part in this. So, any suggestions there?

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Bill Turner
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Ditto what Pat B said about Fred Asbell's Instinctive Shooting and Instinctive Shooting II. I found that Instinctive Shooting II had more in depth instruction on shooting the long bow than any book I've read to date and I've read a bunch. Enjoy the journey. [thumbsup]
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Bill Turner
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I have a 28" draw, and shoot bows from 42 to 48@28". My arrows are cut to 29". 15 to 35lbs. carbons, with 135 to 165 grains up front, fly like darts out of my bows. I prefer 45-50 woodies, cedar, surewood/douglas fir at the same length and weight, but that is just my personal preference.
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last arrow
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Don't worry about aiming, your subconscious will do the aiming for you. Worry about the shot process. If you follow a good shot process and decide and remain aware of what you want to hit while mentally controlling the process, you will generally hit it.

Maybe it is easier to say watch what you want to hit but think through and focus on each step of shooting the bow. Once I learned to do that good shots became normal along with the ability to quickly correct things when bad shots happen.

Joel at Ironmind Hunting and Rick Welch have good descriptions of shot process. I think Rick explains the mechanics better and Joel explains the mental processes of the shot better. Take a look at their websites.

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Bisch
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I did not read all the comment above, but here is my take:

Don't worry about tuning or arrows "too much" at first. As you learn, and are trying to figure out a system that works for you, many things are likely to change. Just try to find an arrow that does not have very much visible wobble, and shoot. Once you get to a point where you think you are getting the form thing down, then concentrate on tuning and arrows. Getting good shooting instinctive is a slow process. You have to give your brain plenty of time, and thousands of shots, to figure it all out.

JMHO,

Bisch

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the rifleman
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I might be the odd guy out on this one... I do agree that form is everything--but I also remember what a struggle it was for me to begin hitting and shrinking groups when all I had to go by was--"its like throwing a ball, look at what you want to hit and your arrow will go there..." I don't disagree that most can learn to do these things--over time and many shots (I also don't disagree that some can just do it naturally..), but for me it all came together after I developed solid form (and redeveloped that lately after some bad habits had compromised my form) and developed an aiming system that works for me, which includes a high nocking point and two fingers under (index and middle) to get my point on closer. I remember struggling with split and very large gaps and hope this info helps someone just starting out---hitting your target does keep your interest when you are beginning---you can always experiment down the road to find your style of aiming.
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McDave
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Good form is the same regardless of your aiming method. Accuracy is 90% good form, 10% aiming, whether you're talking about instinctive aiming or reference aiming. If you want to be a good instinctive shooter, I would spend zero % of your time worrying about it, because instinctive aiming is something that happens in the background while you're shooting arrows working on your form.

I have learned from two great instinctive shooters, Fred Asbell and Rick Welch, and they couldn't be more different in their approach to archery. I don't even think they like each other very much. But their classes are taught the same: 90% form and 10% aiming. Interestingly, the 90% they devote to form is teaching you how to do certain things. The 10% they devote to instinctive aiming is mainly devoted to teaching you not to do certain things,

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Terry Green
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Yes form is Paramount... good form doesn't know how your aiming nor does it really care... form has to do its job regardless.

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Darryl R.
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I totally agree with the previous posts.
Without first learning proper form, you'll drive yourself nuts trying to tune arrows (and you'll spend a lot of $$$) cutting shafts to chase accuracy that you will not see on a consistent basis unless you develop proper form.

Its tempting to ask then, "Well how in the heck am I supposed to figure out proper form if my arrows are not tuned?"

The answer is - shoot arrows that have the least wobble in flight like Bisch suggested. Do that for a Looong time.

My draw length is 28". There were times in my early learning where I was drawing 29.5" (over expanding) as I'm only 5'10".

You have got to obtain the 'feel' of proper form and a consistent shot cycle. The fundamentals of form are absolute - you gotta have the proper alignment of angles or you will not get good flight or accuracy. Each individual has their own minor tweaks that vary from shooter to shooter, but they all have proper gross form alignment of angles, and a consistent shot process. Its the same as with golf. Good golfers all have th fundamentals of proper form, with minor differences individually.

There is no fast way to accuracy in order his art. It takes thousands of shots over time, and you will tweak your tecnique many times over until you finds what feels good for you.

You'll reach a point where you can consistently shoot that 'least wobbly" arrow into groups at 20 yards that are the size of your open hand. If you can do that, (consistently) then your form and technique is pretty good.

Now if you start tuning (spine, arrow length, head weight, brace height, etc), you'll easily see the difference between a properly tuned arrow and your "least wobbly" arrow.

I have what I believe are nearly perfectly tuned arrows. When I'm in the zone - they fly like bullets and hit my mark (where I look) dead on with scary consistency and accuracy. However, those same arrows will occassionally 'wag' their tail end to the target. When I see that, I know its me (my form), and not my arrows.

In other words - even with properly tuned arrows I STILL get bad arrow flight every now and then, but it is because I'm doing something wrong in my form and I can usually get back on track within a dozen shots or less.

There is constant practice and refining in this art.

I know this was a long post, but the key to this is - Just Shoot a LOT, every day, over, and over, and over. You will evetually stumble upon the proper form with your individual tweaks that works for you.

When you do - you can tune arrows to a point where you are ridiculously accurate. That kind of accuracy is so darn addictive that you'll have to shoot your bow at least every other day just to enjoy the release of pleasure endorphins in your brain.

People who have reached this ZEN know what I mean by the pleasure endorphins!

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fnshtr
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Darryl R.
[thumbsup] [thumbsup]

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slowbowjoe
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Jon, it makes perfect sense to me. As does most all the advice given. Darryl R. put it well.
Asbell's books (I have both, and relied on the first one a lot in my first years) has some good principles, and good illustrations,; I have found over the years though that some of his technique doesn't work for me personally. No one "technique" does.

Goes back to some of what others say: Eventually you find you own form, suited to you personally.


As far as aiming and tuning - practice, together with information, will guide you. Instinctive is not, at least to my mind, a strictly defined style. definitely aim (by using the arrow for alignment with my sight picture), but don't gap, string walk, or such. Sometimes considered instinctive ( I always focus and aim for my target), sometimes not. Works for me.

I'm with you on the question of tuning and form combined, and agree with what folks are saying, and what you're asking. Get close for now; finer tuning will come along with getting a feel for your gear and your form.

To get some sound feedback on whether your arrows are in the ball bark, let us know the poundage of the bow, your draw lentgh, length of your arrows and point weights you're shooting. That'll help a lot with the tune part of it.

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jonwilson
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Thanks everyone for all of the suggestions. I will continue refining my form and not worry about cutting arrows yet.

slowbowjoe: The bow is a 64" Bear Montana longbow - 45# at 28". My draw length is 26.5".

The arrows are Easton Axis Traditional 500s - GPI = 8.9 and Stock Length = 31". They have not been cut.

Also, I know my head weight will play a part in this. So, any suggestions there?

--------------------
Digital Marketing for the outdoor industry (web design, graphic design, search engine optimization, etc.):
www.gen273.com

Posts: 138 | From: Carthage, Mississippi | Registered: Aug 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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