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» Trad Gang.com » Trad Gang Highlights » Highlights 2006 » A few days with Ray (Page 3)

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Author Topic: A few days with Ray
RayMO
Contributor 2011
Member # 680

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This is too good! [Big Grin] Enjoy this very much, keep it com'in guys. Man those stone points are something else. [thumbsup] [thumbsup]

Hmmm..wonder how many hours from St. Louis to Ray's??

Posts: 1899 | From: St. Louis, Mo | Registered: Apr 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
TexMex
Contributing Member 2006
Member # 3788

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This is great, thank you very much! [thumbsup]
Posts: 6227 | From: Cleburne, Texas | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
knife river
Contributor 2010
Member # 7334

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Well, I've done it twice now... Wrote a lot, went to Photobucket to grab a photo, and returned here to see everything I'd written has disappeared. Yep, I just love computers and all the minor frustration they bring. That's why I enjoyed making a couple points out of the glass from a computer monitor. Low-grade revenge. The glass was great stuff, though: it seemed to be denser than most glass. I hoped that would translate to durability for hunting.

The second afternoon we headed toward a crossroad which seemed to be a the center for a lot of hog sign. Just as we rounded a bend, we could see a big one in the road. And it was was working our way! I hopped out of the truck and half-sprinted through the woods to close the distance. I took cover in tall broomstraw on the side of the road, nocked a 125 grain glass-tipped arrow and waited. And waited. Christmas came and went and the hog didn't show.

Behind me, a couple little porkers trotted out into the road and were soon joined by almost a dozen more. They were only a hundred yards out and I hoped they didn't come my way. The last time I'd seen the big guy, he was only 40 or 50 yards out. Then two whitetails popped out of some pines over my left shoulder. They pegged me and blew and stomped to prove it. After they finally moved on, I decided to check on the big guy. The wind was in my favor and three careful steps into the road showed that he was gone.

I could see Ray off in the distance and joined him. He was almost beside himself that I hadn't shot the big hog -- he thought it had been standing broadside to me in the road at less than 15 yards. I wish! Ray's binoculars had compressed the distance and made it look like the hog was nearly in my lap. I don't think it ever got closer than 40 yards.

There was still plenty of light, though, so I stalked down the road where I'd last seen the big one. Three piglets kept chasing each other across the road so I went low and slow. Up ahead I could hear sloshing and slurping. Lots of it...

The sow suddenly popped into the road and gave me a big hairy eyeball. She bailed out with a big grunt and the three piglets. There were still more pigs in the wallows past her, though. Another five minutes to cover the next ten yards gave me a view of two nice pigs working the mud. 35 yards is too far for me, so I tried to close the distance. One of them saw or smelled something and left the wallow for thick cover. The other hesitated a few seconds but then followed. But there was a third hog still slurping behind some tall marsh grass! I closed the distance while I was screened. The hog stepped out broadside and spotted me, but my bow was already up and the arrow was in the air.

I love to watch arrows fly and this one was a thing of beauty. The white nock traced a perfect arc to where the hog was just starting to turn away. I wasn't sure if I hit it, though -- that hog was moving fast and I figured the distance to be about 28 yards. I started looking for my arrow but couldn't find it. Not surprising in all the mud and grass. Then came the sharp, dry snap of a breaking cedar shaft! Maybe I'd better look for blood.

Three yards into the thicket, it looked as though the ground had been painted. It continued down a well-used trail, but after 30 yards it disappeared. No blood. I backed up to the last sign and heard lots of flies buzzing in the thicket. On my hands and knees I peered into a black hole under the bushes and saw the hog on its side. I poked it with my Blacktail's limbtip to make sure it was finished before I reached in and pulled it out. The fletched end of my arrow was laying with it. Another 2/3 of my arrow was around somewhere and I'd like to find it.

Back in the skinning shed we found the middle third of the cedar shaft still inside the hog. The little glass point had done its job well. The arrow had traveled diagonally through the 90 pounder, entering almost dead center on the body and exiting low on the opposite front shoulder, slicing vitals on the way. Most interesting was that it had cut one rib and completely severed another as it exited. I really wanted to find the point now to see how it had been damaged.

The next day I was back at the kill site. I followed the pig's trail all the way back to the death bed. Far under the brambles I could see the arrow point! I pulled it out and looked it over -- if there was any damage it was on a scale too small for the naked eye. It looked and felt sharp, ready for a new shaft, but I wanted to save it just as it was.

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[ March 19, 2007, 01:42 PM: Message edited by: knife river ]

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TGMM Family of the Bow

"Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Posts: 1696 | From: St Simons Island, GA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Al33
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 3953

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Way to go Woody!!! [thumbsup]
Posts: 721 | From: Marietta, Georgia | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
knife river
Contributor 2010
Member # 7334

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Would you believe that it's easy to mistake a hummingbird for a hog? It happened to me a dozen times. Rubythroats were abundant, probing red trumpet flowers for nectar, snatching gnats out of the air, and sifting through the ends of pine boughs for bugs. When they made an abrubt change in direction, the "thrum" of their wings sounded amazingly similar to a hog grunt. There seemed to be a distinct lack of hogs 15 feet in the air, so I gradually learned to sort them out. Hummers near the ground, though, always doubled my heart rate and brought an arrow to the string.

The next afternoon the wind wasn't cooperating for the wallows we intended to hunt. We hoped the wind would shift as the sun went behind the big yellow pines, so to kill time, we walked down an overgrown road. Turkeys flew up to roost and armadillos snuffled through leaves. One 'dillo wobbled up to less than a yard from me. My thought was to try to tip him over with the toe of my boot -- not punt the little guy, but just see how he reacted, if I could even tip him over. At about two feet, he finally winded me (or heard me laughing) and ran away to safety -- all of about five feet away.

Then Ray judged that the wind was better and the hunt was on. And almost as quick, it was over. The first wallow, wide and shallow, backed by Virginia creepers and blackberries, held about four pigs, all about the same size. Ray motioned me on and I stayed low behind tall sedge as I closed the distance. I raised slowly, chose the closest one, and let an arrow fly. The flint-tipped arrow closed the 13 yards fast and the pig disappeared behind the vines. Ray joined me and said he'd heard the pig die, so I went to to retrieve it less than ten yards from where it was shot. I picked up the arrow (a pass-through) and except for the mud, it looked perfect.

I met Ray back on the road: another pig was rooting 25 yards away in another wallow. Ray nocked an arrow and ghosted down the road. In less than a minute, that pig was also ready for a trip to the skinning shed.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

"Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Posts: 1696 | From: St Simons Island, GA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
knife river
Contributor 2010
Member # 7334

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The skinning shed deserves a better name. It's a first-class operation, with running water, cement floors, screened work area, two electric hoists, metal tables, and a walk-in cooler set to 37 degrees. After several days in the heat, I tended to linger in the cooler "admiring" the hogs.

 -

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TGMM Family of the Bow

"Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Posts: 1696 | From: St Simons Island, GA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tippit
Associate Sponsor - Contributor 2017
Member # 1030

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Sounds like you guys had a blast! Beautiful points and beautiful area...Doc
Posts: 8500 | From: Carlisle, MA & Aiken, SC | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
knife river
Contributor 2010
Member # 7334

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One afternoon I made a six or seven inch corner tang knife from a piece of raw Texas chert known as "amoeba." One theory about them is that they weren't hafted, but put on a short thong around the wrist. We butchered the first hog using steel knives, both of us grousing about how fast our knives lost their edge. I decided to give some flint flakes and the corner tang a try. The flint flakes, although pretty good sized and ridicoulously sharp, were a bit hard to hold.

The corner tang was nothing short of amazing. After dulling the back edge so I wouldn't cut my fingers off, the stone blade slid through the heavy hogs' hides like butter. The trick was not applying too much pressure and cutting too deep. I also avoided bones as the flint is brittle, but for skinning and filleting, it worked better than anything Ray or I have ever experienced. I really liked the wrist thong, too. Whenever I needed to pull hide or shift the carcass, I just dropped the knife. A gentle flick brought it back to my hand. After three hogs, it seemed as sharp as when we started. I saw one small nick in the edge which I think I caused by accident.

I know what'll be in my pack from now on. It's just hard to believe that for all these years knapping I'm just now learning to actually use these tools. Not that I'm slow or anything... (ggg)

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TGMM Family of the Bow

"Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Posts: 1696 | From: St Simons Island, GA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
vermonster13
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You are an artist without a doubt.

Sounds like you and Ray had a blast and came out of it with some real good eating to boot.

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TGMM Family of the Bow
For hunting to have a future, we must invest ourselves in future hunters.

http://www.blackswanarchery.com/

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JC
Contributor 2014
Member # 148

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Man, you guys sho nuff got the grillin fixins now! Great story guys...and thanks for so many high quality pics. You've got me promising myself I'm gonna take more/better next outing.

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"Being there was good enough..." Charlie Lamb reflecting on a hunt
TGMM Brotherhood of the Bow

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Ray Hammond
SPONSOR
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It was a blast, and Woody is a great person to share a camp with! He even helped me with the dishes...well, he did 'em, actually!!! [thumbsup] [Not Worthy] [campfire]

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“Courageous, untroubled, mocking and violent-that is what Wisdom wants us to be. Wisdom is a woman, and loves only a warrior.” - Friedrich Nietzsche

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knife river
Contributor 2010
Member # 7334

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vermonster13, I'm not even going to mention Ray's incredible cooking. If I breathed even a WORD about the tortellini or the filets or the lambchops, much less the cheeses and wine, there'd be a stampede!!! (As if the great company, hunting, scenery and wildlife weren't enough!!!)

You folks who won the St Jude's auction for a hunt with Ray are in for the treat of a lifetime!!! Good on all of you, and especially Ray! Word up, my homie! Mad props to you, my brutha of a diffrent mutha!

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TGMM Family of the Bow

"Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity."
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Posts: 1696 | From: St Simons Island, GA | Registered: Sep 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
vermonster13
SPONSOR
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I hope to chase them with Ray someday myself.

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TGMM Family of the Bow
For hunting to have a future, we must invest ourselves in future hunters.

http://www.blackswanarchery.com/

Posts: 21856 | From: Rutland, Vermont | Registered: Feb 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BryanB
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 5829

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Nice job on the hogs.
Fantastic looking knapping.
Bryan

Posts: 619 | From: Portland, OR | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Longbeard
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 2181

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Sure wish we had hog hunting like that here in WV!!!!
Posts: 251 | From: West Virginia | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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