JOIN TRAD GANG




INFO: Trad Archery for Bowhunters



CLICK HERE TO LEAP TO THE
2017 ST. JUDE AUCTION FORUMS


Trad Gang.com Post New Topic  Post A Reply
MY PROFILE | directory login | register | search | FAQ | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » Recipes/Grilling/ Barbecuing/Smokers » Canning Deer Meat Pictures added (Page 3)

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!   This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   
Author Topic: Canning Deer Meat Pictures added
Joseph
Contributor 2007
Member # 2732

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Joseph   Email Joseph   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
TTT

--------------------
"Politicians are like diapers, they need to be changed often and for the same reason"

Posts: 1884 | From: Helena, Mt | Registered: Feb 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
ksbowman
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 9073

Icon 1 posted      Profile for ksbowman   Email ksbowman   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
This is a very informative canning thread. TTT

--------------------
I would've taken better care of myself,if I'd known I was gonna live this long!

Posts: 1836 | From: Paola,kansas | Registered: Apr 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Butts2
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 5836

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Butts2   Email Butts2   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
In part of this thread -after reading all of them- someone mentioned thawing out meat and then canning/pressure cooking. Does the meat need to be thawed completely prior to the canning or partially. I have until Christmas before I get to try.....guess I was not suppose to look in "that" closet. [bigsmyl]

--------------------
Schafer Silvertip 58" 61@28
Hunter Safety Certificate
Bowhunter Safety Certificate
Colorado Traditional Archers Society
Colorado Bowhunters Associatio
Pope & Young Club

Posts: 584 | From: Silt, Colorado | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tracks
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 20019

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Tracks   Email Tracks   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Butts2:
In part of this thread -after reading all of them- someone mentioned thawing out meat and then canning/pressure cooking. Does the meat need to be thawed completely prior to the canning or partially. I have until Christmas before I get to try.....guess I was not suppose to look in "that" closet. [bigsmyl]

You will want to thaw the meat completely before canning so that you know it has cooked completely and evenly.

USDA recommends using a pressure cooker, not the oven.

Here is a link to the USDA canning guide (Guide 1 and Guide 5 are most pertinent to this discussion.):
http://extension.usu.edu/utah/htm/fcs/food-preservation-canning/usda_home_canning

Posts: 130 | From: 60 N, 145 W | Registered: Apr 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Butts2
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 5836

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Butts2   Email Butts2   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Thanks Tracks! Went to the site and thought I'll just print it out... first guide is 40 pages...yikes. [readit]

--------------------
Schafer Silvertip 58" 61@28
Hunter Safety Certificate
Bowhunter Safety Certificate
Colorado Traditional Archers Society
Colorado Bowhunters Associatio
Pope & Young Club

Posts: 584 | From: Silt, Colorado | Registered: Feb 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Tracks
Thank you for that information, that is awesome instruction. What a great sight.

Here are some things I have learned over the years, the canning process does work in the oven, and although it works just a little better in a pressure cooker “time wise” I’ve done this both ways. The pressure cooker save a lot of time per batch, make sure you can’t feel any give in the top of your lids before you open a jar, look for a strong vacuum when you open a jar it should take some effort to open a jar. If in doubt throw it out period.
Bruce

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Here is a recipe I love to make with a canned Jar of venison.

Cut up tomato, onion, lettuce,
Get a bag of shredded cheese
Some hot sauce
Flour tortillas
Re-fried beans.
A bag of taco seasoning

Empty a jar of deer meat into a pan heat the meat until half of the liquid is cooked back into the meat. Put the seasoning into the meat and finish cooking the liquid back into the meat, cook your re-fried beans at the sometime.
Bake your Flour tortillas as desired. [jumper] [jumper] [jumper]

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
amicus
Contributor 2016
Member # 12213

Icon 1 posted      Profile for amicus   Email amicus   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I followed the receipe and it turned out great.

Thanks

Gilbert

--------------------
The blessing of the Lord, it maketh rich and He addeth no sorrow with it. Prov 10;22

A sinner saved by Grace.

Posts: 1108 | From: Texas | Registered: Apr 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
tuscarawasbowman
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 34861

Icon 1 posted      Profile for tuscarawasbowman   Email tuscarawasbowman       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by 11FIFER1:
Morning, I think I need a good read on this subject, can anyone recommend a good book or web site? one thing springs to mind, are the cans/jars recyclable? or do you just buy a new lot?
I've been watching a TV program on the hard times from the 1900's to the 50's, this is the sort of everyday product we would have used if there were food surplus to requirements. (no chance of that for the masses!
Took a war to end the hard times, hope its not going to be the same this time!
What a thought, no electricity or gas no coal industry , makes me shudder, and just think your lucky enough to be getting advice from our Government, today I believe! I'm sure they will come out smiling!
I'm a great believer in prevention is better than cure, this sort of survival should be passed down, just in case, I often go shooting to bag a few rabbits, most people I offer them too wouldn't know what to do with them if dressed out let alone if there still in their jackets! that's shocking, hang on just heard a crack, that's the soap box breaking, got to get off!
thanks again
Jim

Going on at least 4 generations of canning in my family perhaps more. I want to add jars can be easily found at some flea markets,antique malls etc. at sometimes a fraction of the price of buying them new. The ball canning book is a good one however I prefer one my wife picked up called "The Farmers wife canning and preserving cookbook" All recipes are from the early 1900's and simple but very good. There peaches in syrup recipe is the best tasting I have found on that dish.
Also I would like to add some tips and such if folks don't mind.

Bad Jars- As others said chipped mouths and cracks are a no go. Also if you have a jar that does not seal after you dump the contents (or eat it within a day or 2) mark the bottom of a jar with X with a sharpie. When you go to can next time if that jar does not seal again you know it is defective and should pitch it.

Prepping jars- Wash jars in good hot soapy water before canning paying close attention to the sealing part. This should remove any oils or crap from the jar and making sure you get a good seal.

Filling jar- When filling up the jar with all your goodies make sure to use a funnel. Anything that gets on the sealing surface can prevent it from sealing. If you do drop anything onto the sealing surface wipe it up with a paper towel.

Lids- I always use new lids and try to use them within two years. I prefer not to use them if they
are any older than that. I have no concrete proof that older lids cause jars not to seal however it seems that way when I have used older lids I have problems with sealing.

After processing- When you pull your jars out of a canner (have no experience with oven so can't say that things are the same) don't touch with the lids let them cool down and they will seal on their own. If you have a couple that are giving you a hard time you can put them in the fridge (not freezer) and it will speed the sealing process. If you are going to do that let them cool a little first.

I know the first time you can stuff it feels like a science experiment or that you are working with precious metals but it really isn't all that hard.
Hope someone got something from this.

Posts: 684 | From: OH | Registered: Sep 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lyagooshka
Contributor 2014
Member # 37279

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lyagooshka   Email lyagooshka   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
tuscarawasbowman,

Ditto to what you said. I also have no experience with the oven, though I would suggest a stove-top pressure canner. They are online from $50 and up. Nothing fancy, minimal upkeep, and lasts forever. One reason for the pressure canner is that 99.9999999999% of little nasties are killed off at 200 degrees. The 0.000000001% are usually NOT a problem, but... In a pressure canner (at 10-15 lbs for 90 minutes) you actually get temperatures above 212 degrees. Things cannot survive above the boiling point of water, so it is actually steralizing the jars(in much the same way as an autoclave).

Next, so long as the jars are clean, re-washing isn't really needed, just rinsing. Many dishwashers today have a "sterilize" setting. This heats the bottles enough to kill the little nasties, but it also makes the glass nice and hot so that you don't "shock" it by putting it into a hot oven/pot. Just lay your lids flat so the seal does not warp. This also helps as I am canning not only meat, but cooked stew and chili. Many times I come home and need a quick meal for the family, so I empty a can of stew or chili into a pan, heat it as I make rice, and by the time the rice is ready, we are G2G (good to go). 10-15 minutes tops and the family is [well] fed.

Lastly, I have never had a jar go bad on me. I have eaten things that were close to 2 years old. I am not suggesting it, but if you use good bottles and quality lids (the ones at the store are usually great, just make sure they are not damaged if you are reusing them) there should [theoretically] be no time limit as you have a sterile enviornment inside that jar.

I cannot agree more about the "first time". But after you get the hang of it, you realize that as long as you did your prep and you keep things clean, it's really a breeze. I really stress the prep [even as mich as the clean] since it's a real pain to have to take your jars out half way because you forgot to add salt or pepper or whatever. hope this helps. Be well.

--------------------
"I have known many meat eaters to be far more nonviolent than vegetarians." - Mahatma Gandhi

Posts: 37 | From: PA | Registered: Oct 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
lyagooshka
Contributor 2014
Member # 37279

Icon 1 posted      Profile for lyagooshka   Email lyagooshka   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
11FIFER1:

To answer your question about a book, there are a few I have and use.

Ball (the jar people) have:
"Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving" or you can get quite a bit of free info on their web site at: http://www.freshpreserving.com/home.aspx

Another good one is:
"A Guide to Canning, Freezing, Curing & Smoking Meat, Fish & Game" by Wilbur F. Eastman.

Lastly, our own USDA has a guide out called:
"Complete Guide to Home Canning and Preserving", last revised in 2009, it is actually a very good guide and has lots of info. I am never a fan of government publication (FM, DD form..., DA Form..., the army ruined that for me) but this book is [IMHO] a must-have.

All of these are available at internet (and local) book sellers. Don't forget to check your local library. Hope this helps. Be well.

Alex

[coffee]

--------------------
"I have known many meat eaters to be far more nonviolent than vegetarians." - Mahatma Gandhi

Posts: 37 | From: PA | Registered: Oct 2012  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
These instructions are from the point of packing the canning jars, butcher your deer and cut the meat you want to use for canning into 2 inch cubes. Put your venison in the freezer or refrigerator for later use.
 -

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Take your canning jars and wash them. Then you cut up some onion and garlic, I use one clove of garlic per jar and a slice of onion one in the bottom of the jar and one on top of the packed meat, so count how many jars you can put in your pressure cooker or oven, dice one clove of garlic for each jar and two slices of onion for each jar.
After you have cleaned your jars bring a small pot of water to a boil.
 -

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Put one lid for each jar in the boiling water. Take a slice of onion and some hot pepper rings and coat the bottom of the jar.
 -

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Traditional-Archer
2017 Contributor
Member # 11251

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Traditional-Archer   Email Traditional-Archer   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
Pack the meat on top of the onion and hot peppers and push as much air out of the jar as possible, pushing down on top of the meat packing it tight, sometimes using a wooden spoon will help with this part of the job. Put another slice of onion on top.
 -

--------------------
We are what we do repeatedly. Execellence is, therefore, not an act but a habit.

Artistole (384-322 B.C.)
Philosopher

Posts: 718 | From: Columbia,PA | Registered: Jan 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
  This topic comprises 5 pages: 1  2  3  4  5   

Quick Reply ~ PLEASE THINK BEFORE YOU POST! - Is your post trad bowhunting related? Check the FAQ or EMAIL if you're unsure!
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Shoot On Over To:


Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | Privacy Statement

Copyright 2003 thru 2017 ~ Trad Gang.com ©

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1