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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » Hunting Legislation & Policies » Should all Wolves be delisted? (Page 1)

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Author Topic: Should all Wolves be delisted?
Hud
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As reported by CNN (not an endorsment) 19 elk were slaughtered by Wolves at a feeding station near Jackson, WY. Most were calves. http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/25/us/wyoming-wolf-pack-elk-slaughter/index.html

A number of news agencies are reporting this as a rare event, or "surplus killing". I did not realize there was a surplus of elk? Who sees the ones killed in the backcountry, at night?

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Posts: 2060 | From: Ridgefield, Wa. | Registered: Jul 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
pinky
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The wintering population objective is 5,000 elk. However, the size of the wintering herd generally reaches 6,000-7,000 elk or more. Refuge managers continue to work with the Wyoming Game & Fish Department and Grand Teton National Park to bring the number of wintering animals closer to established targets as outline in the Bison and Elk Management Plan. This is for the Jackson area National Elk Refuge.

this is from the US Fish and Wildlife web site.
The wolves have their place.

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Posts: 292 | From: Msla, MT | Registered: Jul 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Chad Orde
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Deer population has plummeted in the UP of Michigan few hard winters combined with the wolf and black bear predation. My opinion is just treat them like coyotes let's face it back when there was huge bountys on them they where eradicated that won't happen again and we don't have to worry about killing them off they are back to stay now. I grew up with them in Northern MN and only ever seen two, never having a open season on them they where not even scared of me. I love wolves and glad we have them would also love to be able to hunt them.

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Chad Orde
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Posts: 693 | From: Northern Michigan | Registered: Nov 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Thumper Dunker
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What Chad said.

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Hud
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Perhaps, but the Government was behind the introduction of Canadian Wolves, and they are hardly objective. Secondly, the RMEF and other groups, like the OHA are in favor. The Government's plan was to delist when the population of Wolves was sustainable. Wolves have established packs in WA, OR, and have been reported in other states (CO, AZ and CA). Their expansion into new territory suggest they are sustainable in MT, WY, ID. Oregon (OHA) got the State to delist, but the other side has filed a lawsuit.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

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Michael Arnette
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What chad said as well...wolves are the missing link in a natural ecosystem and provide the balance needed to eliminate the need for human hunting.
We have to understand as hunters that if we are not necessary we may lose the privilege. Anti-hunters know this well

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northener
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Mn. Has the largest wolf pop in the lower 48 with over 2400 animals and 470 packs. All I know is deer and moose numbers are way down where wolf is present.

I am not against the the wolf, in fact I am fascinated by them.

I do think wolf should be managed by each state and not by the federal government. There certainly is huntable numbers in Mn. Wi and Mich.

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Posts: 602 | From: Mn. | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
northener
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I should note here as well. I have hunted deer in northern Mn. Since the early 80's I have yet to see a wolf, only heard their mournful cries. Deer gut piles are always gone by next mourning.

Mn could open archery wolf and deer and run together for the same period of time and never put a dent in the wolf population. Many would pay good money for the opportunity though.

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wingnut
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Bow hunting for wolves will not make a dent. Actually rifle hunting does little to control an out of control population. Starvation works after all the game animals are gone and they finish eating the livestock.

If you want huntable populations of elk, deer and moose, wolves are a big problem.

I've watched the elk and moose populations in Idaho plummet since the wolves showed up to a level that very few non resident licenses are sold each year. It's a huge economic hit the states that have wolves.

Delisting, trapping and aerial control will work like they do in Alaska.

Mike

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Paul Cousineau
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Was out turkey scouting this afternoon and found a deer carcass and wolf tracks. I saw two in the woods last fall. We really badly need liberal hunting and trapping seasons to reduce wolf numbers.

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The lazy do not roast any game, but the diligent feast on the riches of the hunt. -Proverbs 12:27

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centaur
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What we have in NW Wyoming is a surplus of wolves, not a surplus of elk. Since wolf "reintroduction" in Yellowstone, elk and moose populations have fallen sharply, and the wolf huggers love to talk about how well the aspen forests are doing since there are less elk. I would much rather hear, smell and see more elk than have elkless aspen forests.

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Burly
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Yes, they should be delisted. They need to be managed.
Posts: 89 | From: Michigan | Registered: Mar 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
catman1
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The only good wolf is a dead wolf, they produce like rabbits.
They are #2 in the animal food chain next to a grizzly in N America, but they kill more numbers, they kill in packs and are very good at it.

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NEB
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Guys, I am a wildlife biologist and have been fortunate to work on predator reintroduction studies. With that background out of the way I have to say as hunters we are part of the conservation tool, but we must also try to understand the entire ecosystem and not just the portion we admire the most.

To answer the post directly, the answer is no. The red wolf population in the southeastern U.S. is still in need of conservation efforts. The gray wolf seems to be the most controversial species, so I will try to offer another point of view. There is scientific support that shows the destruction of fish habitat and water quality from stream bank erosion caused by over grazing by western wildlife (primarily elk and bison). Biologist are using sound predator/prey science and we as hunters are a small tool in the management of this relationship. The wolves are native creatures and we need to try to coexist with them as predators after the same prey.

We are also experiencing a decline in wildlife from the explosion of coyotes in the southeast. The studies I am reading are interesting, and right now no one has an answer. Some studies even suggest hunting/trapping is leading to increased litter sizes (feral hogs are showing a similar relationship). There will be growing pains as we learn how to manage the modern predator/prey relationship.

As a biologist, the hardest thing to manage is the wildlife/human conflict. All that I can offer is to be vocal about your opinion to game biologists and respect their efforts to find an equilibrium of predators, prey, and economics. There is a bigger picture than just the game we hunt. As traditional bowhunters, we are more tuned in to our surroundings than the typical commercialized hunting we see on TV. We should all take the challenge of learning how all of God's creation works in harmony and find our relationship with it before we pass judgement.

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Cory Mattson
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existing stable populations should be delisted - none of the populations in the lower 48 are being managed anywhere near correctly - I see a basic problem when introduced wolves have more "rights" than humans. I see wolves being introduced where no one is asking for them. NC is a good example. Nobody wants wolves re introduced. Might be some support from anti hunters. The governing agencies are so zealous to introduce wolves they are using blood lines that are mixed with coyotes. The tame zoo stock too seems to be a problem. We were feeding Red Wolves in the early 90s and most of those dogs couldn't figure out how to live in the wild.
Bottom line is are you willing to give up your elk tags and deer tags so wolves can hunt year round? And many of today's hunters are not even aware of the potential opportunities already lost to support wolves. A study of tags available 20 years ago - 15 years ago - 10 years ago - in units saturated with wolves tells the story.

Riparian damage is done way way way mostly by cattle - that would be another introduced species living on "your" land.

I've been around enough wolves to make my own judgement.

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