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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » Hunting Legislation & Policies » Should all Wolves be delisted? (Page 2)

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Author Topic: Should all Wolves be delisted?
Angus
Trad Bowhunter
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Washington doesn't want to delist them, so I'd propose that several new packs be established in or near, say...Bellevue? Maybe Whidby Island. Why not spread the wonder of wolves and help those who can't get over the Cascades in their electric cars(no charging stations rurally). Of course, i AM being sarcastic here. One pack's already under a death sentence for working over a rancher's cattle, and those involved with this reportedly have received death threats from apparent members of Defenders of Wildlife and the like.

I view them as an invasive species. Yes, they were here--a century ago. No living forest creature has ever encountered a wolf. How is this not (now) an invasive species?

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Posts: 345 | From: Leavenworth, WA | Registered: Aug 2007  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
bobman
Trad Bowhunter
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I love them and hope they stay listed.

I kill plenty of deer in Northern Wisconsin but would enjoy seeing a wolf more than a big buck.

Posts: 217 | From: Georgia | Registered: Oct 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LB243
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Yes de list them. Allow states to regulate as they see fit. Between the wolves and yotes michigans upper pennisula deer herd is in very poor shape. Open them to trapping as well. For those who say they help keep the herds in check, allow more game to be taken by people who will use it! More revinue for the state, more meat for those who need it and more opportunitys for those seeking it. The wolves in the great lakes area were gone for decades. We did just fine! Heck we once had a moose population.
Posts: 33 | From: Belding MI | Registered: Sep 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
LB243
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Yes de list them. Allow states to regulate as they see fit. Between the wolves and yotes michigans upper pennisula deer herd is in very poor shape.
Posts: 33 | From: Belding MI | Registered: Sep 2013  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Bowwild
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I'm a retired wildlife biologist. I'm fine with wolves as long as a management plan is developed that iNCLUDES man. Man is a part of nature, not apart from it.

Too often the USFWS secures informed consent for a plan that includes finite numbers (packs/numbers) and then IGNORES it when the goal is reached. I know that anti-management individuals go to politicians who then apply pressure to the USFWS to ignore solid science.

When the goal is reached, delist!

The ESA is undermined when objects are set, met, and then ignored. I won't go into details, but when I was working, I headed up a 30-person group (Conservation Agreement) to prevent the need to list a certain snake.

After 5 years we determined the snake was secure, the project was successful and didn't need to continue its work. The USFWS asked me to continue the group as a "good example".

My response was it would be a better example if we declared the species secure and moved on.

We did just that.,

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Posts: 5671 | From: Kentucky | Registered: Jan 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Trond
Trad Bowhunter
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Placed a topic here, but it disappeared on me. Here in Norway the government are legislating the slaughtering of 47 out of a total of 68 wolves. All this because of a few sheep and a couple of hunting dogs. This is madness!

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BearPaw Cayuga 66", 37# @29"
Quicks Peregrine II, with Samick Red Fox limbs, 64", 35# @28"
"The more you work, the luckier you get." Byron Ferguson

Posts: 333 | From: Norway | Registered: Nov 2014  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
YosemiteSam
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I see no reason to hunt wolves. I can't imagine the meat tastes all that good.

Only humans of our "civilized" culture think that it's okay to exterminate the competitors of our food. Protecting your food stash or life from an immediate threat is one thing. Systematic extermination is an entirely different idea and one that only the "civilized" could think is reasonable or ethical. I don't think the problem is about too many wolves or about too few deer or elk. It's about too many humans. We humans lived in balance with nature for almost 250,000 years. Somehow, in the last few thousand, we've gotten the idea that we're exempt from nature's laws and can do as we darn well please. Oh well. Not much I can do about that. But I certainly won't stand in the way of the wolf's resurgence. Personally, I'd celebrate it. I'd prefer to let them be -- wildlife can fend for themselves just fine without our intervention. If anything, our intervention is their biggest problem.

As for livestock, they can go where evolution intended them to go a long time ago -- extinct. But that's my personal opinion and I'm not a rancher or farmer. Obviously, I'd think differently if I was.

There's a story about wolves and their effects on the Yellowstone ecology. I'm not educated enough to evaluate the study on a scientific level but it seemed to make intuitive sense that a balanced ecosystem benefits all levels of life. I'll happily hunt alongside wolves, coyotes, mountain lions and bears (and risk being hunted by them).

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Stoppin' in the Sierras playing the most sacred of games.

Posts: 171 | From: CA | Registered: Sep 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
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