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» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » The Shooters FORM Forum » Arrow Weight Tuning

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Author Topic: Arrow Weight Tuning
Pmringer
Contributor 2018
Member # 46851

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Good morning,
I am shooting a 58" longbow. At my 31" draw it is showing about 62 lbs. I am currently shooting 325 grain 340 spine carbon arrows with 100 grain inserts and 200 grain field points. I tried 150 grain points and everything shot left. Switched to the 200s and everything flew true despite a minor amount of porpoise which I can work out with the brace height after I change strings.

I have been shooting traditional for a year and am now getting into tuning since I have settled into my form and release.

My question is, it seems most guys are using lighter total arrow weights and I notice a significant increase in speed from some lighter 400s that have a total weight under 400 grains so should I be playing with lighter arrow configurations until they fly point of aim or keep shooting the the 625 weight since they fly true and despite being slower have more momentum on impact?

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Patrick M. Ferringer

Posts: 6 | From: North Carolina | Registered: Nov 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Lee Lobbestael
Trad Bowhunter
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I would go with the heavier arrow weight. It will be quieter, less hand shock, better penetration, and easier on your bow. I think you will see that most trad shooters like 10 grains per pound of draw weight or even heavier, that is right where you are sitting now
Posts: 406 | From: Michigan | Registered: Jan 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
McDave
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At 31”, it's possible you could be drawing your 58” longbow beyond the draw length it was designed for. I know people are designing short longbows that are capable of doing things we didn't dream of a few years ago, but there is a limit to everything.

When you exceed the design specs on a bow, you draw into a range called “stacking” where each increment of draw length adds a disproportionate amount of draw weight. It is difficult to shoot accurately if you are drawing into this range, because draw weight may vary excessively each time you shoot the bow.

Adding to the problem is that drawing a 58” longbow to 31” creates a fairly sharp angle in the string where you hold it with your fingers. This is called “finger pinch” and makes it difficult to get a clean release.

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TGMM Family of the Bow

I'm a man, and I can change, if I have to, I guess.

Posts: 4325 | From: Sacramento, CA | Registered: Oct 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
BMorv
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Yeah, 31" is a really long draw for a 58" longbow. I hope the tips are flipped or as McDave says your tip to string angle will be close to 90 degrees creating stacking issues.
And as Lee says, longbows like heavy arrows, it's what they are designed to shoot.
I think your bow is stressed enough with your draw length; feed it some heavy arrows.

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Life is too short to use marginal bow wood

Posts: 348 | From: Louisiana | Registered: Apr 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Pmringer
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I appreciate the responses and will stick with my setup. Release is smooth on it and stacking is minimal. It is a Beeler longbow so there is some RF/DF. I can shoot this bow immensely better than my recurve.

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Patrick M. Ferringer

Posts: 6 | From: North Carolina | Registered: Nov 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
YosemiteSam
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I shoot a similar setup, though slightly heavier with less draw weight. Do whatever works for you.

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"A good hunter...that's somebody the animals COME to."
"Every animal knows way more than you do." -- by a Koyukon hunter, as quoted by R. Nelson.

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the rifleman
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I choose my set up based on what I want to do. Knowing that I won't be shooting at Ohio Whitetail past 20 yards, I set up with a heavier arrow to hunt with. When I shoot 3D some of our shots are around 35 yards---that's when I go with a lighter arrow, as heavier arrows drop like rocks out of my set up past 25 yards. The lighter arrow obviously gives you a flatter trajectory. Interestingly I find little difference in the two arrows out to 20 yards, so I can use same gaps for both arrows at that distance. Keep in mind that lighter arrows will give you a longer point on distance---not sure if this is your goal or not. Good luck.
Posts: 586 | From: Ohio | Registered: Mar 2011  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Sam McMichael
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I agree with shooting the heavier arrow as long as the performance is good. There is a balance to be struck between speed and penetration. The same applies to trajectory. Go with what gives you the most confidence in your shot.

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Sam

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Josh H
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Heavier is better. Better penetration and quieter as well.
Josh

Posts: 57 | From: North Carolina | Registered: Nov 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Kingstaken
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I agree with David regarding stacking.
I had picked up a HH Halfbreed that was 75@26" that I was hoping to get around 80# to shoot.
At 28" it was over 90#.
Ask the bowyer about the bow and how much it stack's at 31" assuming it was made for 28".

Posts: 1920 | From: NC | Registered: Dec 2006  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

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