Shooters Forum

Contribute to Trad Gang
Become a Trad Gang Sponsor







Trad Gang.com Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply
MY PROFILE | directory login | register | search | FAQ | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Trad Gang.com » Main Forums » The Shooters FORM Forum » Bow cant explained, please

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Bow cant explained, please
heli
Member
Member # 46538

Icon 1 posted      Profile for heli   Email heli   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
I’m trying to figure out if there are any adjustments needed when you cant the bow.
I believe the answer is no, but I let you guys explain it. I saw a video of Terry shooting the bow in all kind of positions, but I’m not sure if he makes any special adjustments.
So let me go through some steps I use to establish a “baseline cant”, for lack of better wording.

First, my goal is to get my eye under the arrow. This forces me to cant the bow, let’s say to 1 o’clock, my head and string hand has to follow to
not induce any string torque.

Now, if I have to move the bow to say, 50 deg, do I have to make any special adjustments than just bending from the waist to keep the eye over the arrow? I assume I keep everything solid/unchanged from the waist up. Is this the correct approach? Set me straight, please javascript:void(0).


Thanks in advance.

Posts: 14 | From: Ontario, Canada | Registered: Aug 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
YosemiteSam
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 45388

Icon 1 posted      Profile for YosemiteSam   Email YosemiteSam   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
For me, it's the same idea as shooting a scoped rifle. In the normal positions (off-hand, benchrest, etc.), the rifle bore, the scope and your eye are all aligned on the vertical plane. Upon firing, the bullet rises to meet the level of the scope and then falls below it but everything stays aligned on the vertical plane due to gravity. So at 0-20 yards, the bullet hits low (bore is below the scope), it may hit high at 100 yards, come down to the scope's zero range at 200 and then fall below again beyond that.

This is basically what happens with an arrow at a 1:00 cant. The arrow starts right under your eye on the vertical plane, rises to meet the level of your eye, rise up a little beyond that (depending on your method) and then begins its descent below. The flat spot of an arrow's trajectory is basically the same as your Maximum Point Blank Range (MPBR) from rifle shooting.

Now imagine that you cant a scoped rifle at an aggressive angle -- say perfectly horizontal. The bore is still pointed at the scope but now gravity won't be bringing it back along the same vertical plane. The bullet angle will now be travelling on the horizontal plane as well since the bullet is travelling toward the center of the scope, which is not above the bore anymore. This is why airgunners and long range shooters affix a level to their scope rail. A small deviation in angle will induce side offset and throw off the shot. I could see the difference in just 17-18 yards with an airgun with a high-mounted scope. Side mounted scopes on older lever-action winchesters, Mosins, some AKs face the same issues.

Back to archery, once you're canting from various angles, the arrow is no longer under your eye. Your arrow (bore) is offset from your eye (scope) and adjustments will need to be made to counteract this offset. The arrow is travelling toward your eye but, since your eye is to the side and over the arrow (diagonal in most cases), the arrow will continue on that sideways path and your shot will go off to the side.

To counteract this, I shoot with 2 gaps: one for that 1:00 position. Another for about 60-70 degrees off vertical (nearly horizontal) for when I'm seated on the ground or need to shoot under a branch. My anchor & alignment is a little different but the vertical gaps are pretty close to the same either way. I just put my arrow tip about 10" to the left of my bullseye and aim a tad higher (lose about 2-yards of trajectory). I've not messed with it much past 20 yards since that's my max hunting range.

The few times I've done 3D, I made a self-imposed rule of no standing shots on turkeys. Learning to shoot between tree limbs, grass, bushes, etc. and accounting for 2 planes of trajectory is a challenge but a fun one.

--------------------
"A good hunter...that's somebody the animals COME to."
"Every animal knows way more than you do." -- by a Koyukon hunter, as quoted by R. Nelson.

Posts: 552 | From: CA | Registered: Sep 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
moebow
Contributor 2017
Member # 19141

Icon 1 posted      Profile for moebow   Email moebow   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
heli, This is back to your other question about anchor. I believe and teach that the orientation of the bow is set by the string in your string hand and not by your bow hand. The bow should follow the angle of the string at anchor.

IF, you are setting the angle of the bow (cant) with the bow hand, then you are likely getting a "twist" of the sting in your string hand. That can place a torque on the string that is counterproductive to a consistent shot.

Arne

--------------------
11 H Hill bows
3 David Miller bows
4 James Berry bows
USA Archery, Level 4 NTS Coach

Are you willing to give up what you are; to become what you could be?

Posts: 2353 | From: Grand Rapids, Minnesota | Registered: Feb 2009  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
heli
Member
Member # 46538

Icon 1 posted      Profile for heli   Email heli   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
YosemiteSam, great analogy. Makes sense and I now understand. Now I know why I was shooting to the right and how to correct it.
Arne, my bad. I meant to say changing the cant of the bow by bending from the waist and not from the bow hand. I understand what you mean, by changing the angle of the string hand, the bow hand follows and therefore it varies the cant of the bow, but keeping them aligned to not introduce string torque.
Thanks again guys for the clarification, I'l learnimg lots.

Posts: 14 | From: Ontario, Canada | Registered: Aug 2017  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
YosemiteSam
Trad Bowhunter
Member # 45388

Icon 1 posted      Profile for YosemiteSam   Email YosemiteSam   Send New Private Message       Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by moebow:

IF, you are setting the angle of the bow (cant) with the bow hand, then you are likely getting a "twist" of the sting in your string hand. That can place a torque on the string that is counterproductive to a consistent shot.

Arne

Never thought of that. Makes me want to play around a bit more while focusing on STRING angle instead of BOW angle. Thanks for that tip.

--------------------
"A good hunter...that's somebody the animals COME to."
"Every animal knows way more than you do." -- by a Koyukon hunter, as quoted by R. Nelson.

Posts: 552 | From: CA | Registered: Sep 2016  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
   

Quick Reply ~ PLEASE THINK BEFORE YOU POST! - Is your post trad bowhunting related? Check the FAQ or EMAIL if you're unsure!
Message:

HTML is not enabled.
UBB Code™ is enabled.

Instant Graemlins
   


Post New Topic  New Poll  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Shoot On Over To:


Contact Us | Trad Gang.com © | Privacy Statement

Copyright 2003 thru 2017 ~ Trad Gang.com ©

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.7.1